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Forklift and Crane (FLEET ) Safety and Health

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Crane and Derrick Safety I and II

Course Introduction

OSHA

Employers who operate cranes on a construction site are responsible for complying with all aspects of the 29 CFR 1926, Subpart CC, Cranes & Derricks in Construction standard, but other employers whose personnel work at the site have responsibilities as well. These employer duties are consistent with OSHA’s multi-employer policy, which imposes compliance duties on employers:

  • who create hazards (creating employers)
  • who correct hazards (correcting employers)
  • who expose employees to hazards (exposing employers
  • who have general supervisory authority over a worksite (controlling employers)

This course is intended to help businesses comply with OSHA’s standard 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC – Cranes & Derricks in Construction. It is designed to address the most common compliance issues that employers will face and to provide sufficient detail to serve as a useful compliance course. It does not, however, describe all provisions of the standard or alter the compliance responsibilities set forth in the standard. The student must refer to the standard itself, which is available on OSHA’s website and in the Federal Register to determine all of the steps that must be taken to comply with the standard.

Standard Compliance Requirements

Employers who have compliance responsibilities under the standard should take this course. In addition, crane operators and other workers who work with or near cranes on construction sites can find information in this course that will make them aware of the hazards cranes present and the steps employers must take to protect against those hazards.

Course Layout

This course is divided into modules that correspond to the sections of the standard. The course focuses on the standard’s provisions that address the most serious hazards and the compliance issues employers will face most frequently. Hazards that arise less frequently are addressed briefly or not at all. In some places, the course refers the reader to sections of the standard for more detailed information about particular topics.

When this course uses the word “you,” it is referring to an employer who operates a crane on a construction site unless the context indicates otherwise. However, as noted above, other employers may also have responsibilities under the standard.

Course Components

When you complete this course, you will have the knowledge of the following components:

  • employer responsibilities
  • covered and excluded equipment in the standard
  • importance of ground conditions
  • responsibility of the company operating the crane
  • assembly and disassembly
  • synthetic slings
  • employee training

Modules

To begin your training, click on the module links below. If you are just starting this course, you should start with module 1.

  1. Crane and Derrick Basics
  2. Employer and Employee Responsibilities
  3. Ground Conditions and Assembly/Disassembly
  4. Power Line Safety
  5. Inspections
  6. Wire Rope Inspection, Selection, and Installation

Crane and Derrick Safety II

Introduction

Welcome to course 821, Crane and Derrick Safety Part II. Please be sure to take course 820, Crane and Derrick Safety Part I before taking this course.

OSHA

This course is intended to help businesses comply with OSHA’s standard 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC – Cranes & Derricks in Construction. It is designed to address the most common compliance issues that employers will face and to determine all of the steps that must be taken to comply with the standard.

Standard Compliance

Employers who use cranes and derricks in construction work must comply with the standard. In addition, other employers on construction sites where cranes and derricks are used are responsible for violations that expose their employees to hazards and, therefore, need to know the requirements of the standard that may affect their employees. Crane lessors who provide operators and/or maintenance personnel with the equipment also have duties under the standard. See the section of this course entitled “Employer Responsibilities” for additional information on the compliance responsibilities of different employers.

Who should take this course?

Employers who have compliance responsibilities under the standard should take this course. In addition, crane operators and other workers who work with or near cranes on construction sites can find information in this course that will make them aware of the hazards that cranes present to them and their co-workers and the steps that employers must take to protect against those hazards.

How do I use this course?

This course is divided into modules that correspond to the sections of the standard. The course focuses on the standard’s provisions that address the most serious hazards and the compliance issues that employers will face most frequently. Some issues that arise less frequently are addressed briefly or not at all. In some places, the course refers the reader to sections of the standard for more detailed information about particular topics.

When this course uses the word “you,” it is referring to an employer who operates a crane on a construction site unless the context indicates otherwise. However, as noted above, other employers may also have responsibilities under the standard.

Modules

To begin your training, click on the module links below. If you are just starting this course, you should start with module 1.

  1. Operation
  2. Signals and Fall Protection
  3. Staying Clear of Hazards
  4. Qualification and Certification
  5. Hoisting Personnel
  6. Multiple Crane/Derrick Operations
  7. Tower Cranes and Derricks
  8. Specialized Cranes and Equipment

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Occupational Fatalities

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a new analysis indicating that highway deaths fell to 32,367 in 2011, marking the lowest level since 1949 and a 1.9 percent decrease from the previous year. The updated 2011 data show the historic downward trend in recent years continued through last year and represent a 26 percent decline in traffic fatalities overall since 2005.(Source: NHTSA)

The risk of roadway crashes associated with on-the-job operation of motor vehicles affects millions of U.S. workers. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that in 2007:

  • Nearly 3.9 million workers in the U.S. were classified as motor vehicle operators.
  • More than 40% (1.6 million) of these motor vehicle operators were employed as heavy truck (including tractor-trailer) drivers

Other workers who use motor vehicles in performing their jobs are spread across numerous other occupations. These include workers who operate vehicles owned or leased by their employer, and those who drive personal vehicles for work purposes.

fleet safety

Does your organization need a Fleet Safety Plan?

To answer that question, answer the following:

  • Do we operate vehicles for work?
  • Do our employees drive for work purposes?
  • Does our staff drive our vehicles for private purposes?
  • Do we provide employees with personal vehicles?
  • Do employees or others drive on our premises?
  • Do we employ contract transport services?

If the answer is ‘yes’ to any of the above the employer is responsible for ensuring appropriate fleet safety systems and controls are in place and that they are operating effectively.

Modules

To begin your training, click on the module links below. If you are just starting this course, you should start with module 1.

  1. The Big Picture
  2. Duties and Responsibilities
  3. Operator Responsibilities
  4. Driver Selection
  5. Driver Training & Evaluation
  6. Accident Investigations
  7. Selection & Maintenance

FORK LIFT SAFETY AND HEALTH

Course Introduction

forklift

Forklift at work during WWII

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) defines a powered industrial truck as a mobile power-propelled truck used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack or tier materials. The basic reference for the safe operation of Powered Industrial Trucks (PITs) is ANSI/ASME B56.1-1993.

Powered industrial trucks, often called forklifts or lift trucks, can be ridden or controlled by a walking operator. As you can see in the photo at the right, forklifts have been around a long time and they’ve gone through some significant design improvements.

A powered industrial truck is defined as a fork truck, tractor, platform lift truck, motorized hand truck, and other specialized industrial trucks powered by electric motors or internal combustion engines. This course does not include safety regarding compressed air or nonflammable compressed gas-operated industrial trucks, farm vehicles, vehicles intended primarily for earth moving, or over-the-road hauling.

incidents

Forklift Accidents
Click to Enlarge

Every year nearly 100 workers are killed and 20,000 are seriously injured in forklift mishaps. The top four types of incidents as a percent of the total forklift related deaths are:

This course contains general information about:

  • the kinds of forklifts commonly available
  • the principles of physics that allow a forklift to lift and move heavy loads safely
  • forklift operator training requirements
  • some basic operator safety rules
  • hazardous locations where carbon monoxide is a problem or a special forklift is needed
  • safety while servicing a forklift

This course is not designed to be a substitute for operator training in the operation of specific forklifts in a specific workplace as required by OSHA regulations.

Modules

To begin your training, click on the module links below. If you are just starting this course, you should start with module 1.

  1. Types of Powered Industrial Trucks (PITs) – Forklifts
  2. Operator Training
  3. How a Forklift Works
  4. Safe Forklift Operations
  5. Safe Forklift Operations (Continued)
  6. Forklift Maintenance
  7. Forklift Maintenance (Continued)

HEAVY EQUIPMENT SAFETY

Course Introduction

introduction

According to OSHA, falls are the leading cause of death in construction jobs. However, close behind, the #2 cause is being struck by a vehicle or other object. About 75% of these fatalities involve trucks, cranes, and other heavy equipment.

Operation of heavy equipment such as excavators, loaders, graders, rollers, and bulldozers should always be done by highly skilled operators who have demonstrated the ability and necessary skills to operate safely. Unsafe practices by either the operator or those around the equipment can create very dangerous situations. Serious injuries can occur if the equipment strikes a worker, or if the equipment is rolled over.

In this course, we will take a look at the various types of heavy equipment and important controls and safe work practices for heavy equipment operations.

Modules

To begin your training, click on the module links below. If you are just starting this course, you should start with module 1.

  1. Heavy Equipment Basics
  2. Heavy Equipment Hazards
  3. Controls and Best Practices
  4. Equipment Operator Safety
  5. Work Zone Safety and Traffic Control